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Muratov’s Nobel medal sold at auction for $103.5 million

Novaya Gazeta editor-in-chief Dmitry Muratov sold his Nobel Peace Prize medal for $103.5 million. The name of the buyer is not called. The auction was held by the American auction house Heritage Auctions.

Bidding began on International Children’s Day June 1 and ended on World Refugee Day June 20. All funds raised during the auction will be transferred to the UNICEF mission, which provides assistance to Ukrainian refugee children who were forced to leave the country against the backdrop of a special military operation by Russia.

Dmitry Muratov Russian journalist, TV presenter, one of the founders and editor-in-chief (from February 1995 to November 2017 and from 2019 to the present) of Novaya Gazeta.

“For his efforts to defend freedom of speech”

Muratov and a Filipino journalist were jointly awarded the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize “for efforts to protect freedom of speech, which is a necessary condition for democracy and lasting peace.” The editor-in-chief of Novaya Gazeta the first Russian journalist and the first Russian citizen to receive this award. Before him, the Peace Prize was received by the physicist and human rights activist Andrei Sakharov and the only president of the Soviet Union, Mikhail Gorbachev.

In the traditional speech at the award ceremony on December 10, 2021, Dmitry Muratov spoke on the current state of affairs in Russian journalism and human rights. He noted the liquidation of the Memorial society *, the sentence of Alexei Navalny, the murder of Russian journalists in the Central African Republic. The editor-in-chief of Novaya Gazeta ended his speech with a call for a moment of silence in memory of the journalists who gave their lives for their profession.

Prior to this, Muratov had already spokethat dedicates the prize to fallen friends and colleagues Anna Politkovskaya, Yuri Shchekochikhin and Igor Domnikov. He also noted that this award is also for those who are now declared “foreign agents, undesirable elements.”

The monetary part of the Muratov Prize spent donations to charitable organizations (including “House with a Lighthouse” and “Give Life”), awards to Novaya Gazeta employees and the creation of a film about the state of the press in Russia. Then the journalist announced about the intention to sell the medal and send funds to help people who became refugees as a result of a special operation in Ukraine. The decision, as Muratov emphasized, was made jointly with the staff of Novaya Gazeta. The Nobel Committee supported the decision of the journalist.

The total amount of the monetary part of the Nobel Prize is 10 million crowns (about $1.1 million). The laureates also receive a medal made of gold and weighing about 200 g.

“The Norwegian Nobel Committee fully understands and supports Dmitry Muratov’s decision. It can provide both moral and material support to one of the most worthy deeds,” said in conversation with RBC Olav Njolstad, head of the Nobel Institute in Norway.

Medals at auctions

Muratov is not the first Nobel laureate who has decided to sell his award. One of the most famous cases of recent times is the sale in 2014 of the Nobel Prize medal. James Watsonwhich he received for discovering the structure of the DNA molecule. $4.8 million medal bought Russian businessman Alisher Usmanov, who later returned it to its owner. The biologist himself said that he would transfer the money from the sale to several American universities and laboratories in Cold Springs Harbor.

“Mr. Watson’s work has contributed to research in the fight against cancer, from which my father died. It is important for me that my funds will be directed to scientific research, and the award will remain with the person who deserved it like no other. I didn’t want the medal of an outstanding scientist to become a bargaining chip,” Usmanov said.

I sold my medal at auction and Francis Creek, who shared the award with Watson for the same research. It was sold at auction Christie’s per $2.2 million in 2013. In 2016, the medal was sold and l1988 Nobel Prize in Physics winner Leon Lederman. For a reward he won $765 thousand

At the same time, “laid the tradition” theoretical physicist and Niels Bohr, who received the Nobel Prize in 1940 and decided to sell it for charitable purposes to help children who became refugees as a result of the Finnish War. Together with Bohr, he donated his medal for the same purposes laureate of the Nobel Prize in Medicine August Krogh.

For charitable purposes, other awards were also sold at auctions. In particular, in March 2012, the Ukrainian boxer Vladimir Klichko broke up per $1 million with the gold of the 1996 Olympics, however, parted for a short time – the buyer immediately returned the award to the athlete. The money went to the Klitschko Brothers Foundation, which helps young athletes.

Ukrainian group Kalush Orchestrawho won the Eurovision this year, sold your reward at the auction for $900 thousand prize bought cryptocurrency exchange WhiteBit, the proceeds will be used to purchase drones for the Ukrainian army.

Legendary Brazilian soccer player Pele in 2016 held a sale of his awards, bailed out for them at auction in London about £3.6m. The most expensive lot was at the Jules Rimet Award, specially made for the best football player of the century and sold for 394 thousand pounds. A significant part of the proceeds went to help the largest children’s hospital in Brazil.

In 2013 Portuguese football player Cristiano Ronaldo took part in a charity auction of Real Madrid, exposing to auction his Golden Boot. The prize that Ronaldo received as the bestth player of the previous season, went under the hammer for $1.5 million, the money was used to build schools in Gaza.

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